“Dr. Who: The Twelfth Doctor” #01: New Adventures, Familiar Faces

Minor spoilers ahead, readers be wary!

Dr. Who: The Twelfth Doctor #1

Our friends over at Titan Comics have given Mind of the Geek the opportunity to get a sneak peek at the upcoming issue of Dr. Who: The Twelfth Doctor #1, which officially hits shelves October 15, 2014. Creators Robbie Morrison and Dave Taylor have brought the newest addition to the time-lord family line to comic books, and have done so in a spectacular fashion.

Dr. Who: The Twelfth Doctor has every staple and trademark of a classic, Moffat-written episode of the wildly popular show. Clara is confused about something mundane and commonplace at the beginning, the Doctor insults her in a roundabout way, they travel to a planet and find something they are not expecting, adventure ensues, Clara goes missing and the Doctor swoops into action. However, as with most first issues of a new series, this book sets itself apart form the show by introducing what is, to me, a new villain for the dynamic duo to struggle with; a small, horned fiery-stone creature that calls itself or its dastardly organization ‘Hyperios’.

It is the tried-and-true formula of a Dr. Who episode and the familiar, lovable banter between Twelve and Clara that makes this comic enjoyable. The dialogue for Clara feels exactly as she is in the show, and even her facial expressions are drawn with a familiarity that screams ‘Clara the Impossible Girl’ as she gets into a few sticky, laughable situations with some monkey/skunk hybrids. The events that happen in the book feel similar to what one would expect to happen in the show, and this strengthens the story by making it feel utterly genuine and perfectly balanced.

Twelve speaks in a way not dissimilar to Clara, in that every sentence, anecdote or paragraph written for him in the book rings in the readers head beautifully in that wry Scottish accent of Capaldi’s. Ever since the unveiling of the new Doctor, Twelve has been an enigma in terms of accurate ways to describe him. Some people will calm him dire, others will call him misunderstood, lost, violent or dangerous. That is the beauty of Dr. Who, however; he is whoever the reader or watcher sees him as. In this case, in this particular book, he is whimsical but strong, and very driven. His adventurous spirit and comedic aloofness fit perfectly with his dialogue in a way that drives the story forward through everyone of his paragraphs. He is quick witted and sincere, and even delivers a sound moral speech early in the book, followed by a quick discourse on why he is the best dressed Doctor.

 

Once again, the accuracy of the characters only adds to the books overall atmosphere and feeling of genuine Whovian wealth.

Even Twelve’s eyebrows are captured perfectly. Look at these big, serious rage filled caterpillars.

With the likeliness to the characters being so spot on, it really leaves the story to shine on its own. For fans of the series, the formula will feel familiar and smooth. It is so simply a Dr. Who story that there is little other way to describe it, and therein lies its beauty. Aside from the obviously excellent art style, the story is paced as an episode is, and reads smoothly and intelligibly. The coloring is heavy handed and well placed, making the alien world Clara and Twelve find themselves on a lush and beautiful landscape suited perfectly for the comic book format.

The weakest character in the book is already made secondary by the last few panels, as he is introduced as the villain but quickly outed as a simple figurehead of sorts, which works well because if he had stayed in the story any longer, it would have taken a serious hit to the overall quality of the book. Mr Kano Dollar, you are cordially invited to leave the evil deeds to Hyperios.

Dr. Who: The Twelfth Doctor goes to great lengths to achieve a feeling of genuine authenticity, and achieves its goal after the first few pages. With a book that captures the essence and atmosphere of the series this well and introduces a new villain in a spectacular manner, this first issue seems to be the start to an excellent story arch. It is no small feat to combine years worth of character development and story into a new start in a new medium for a new Doctor, but Morrison and Taylor have delivered to the highest extent.

Look for Twelve and Clara (and the TARDIS of course) on October 15, and stay tuned for the continuation of their intergalactic story.

 

Peter Capaldi guests on ‘The Graham Norton Show’, is awesome

Not everyone grows up as a huge pop culture fan, and then get to play the object of their fandom. Apparently – before he became a well-known actor across the pond – Peter Capaldi made a run to conquer the official Doctor Who fan club, as he discusses on this week’s episode of The Graham Norton Show:

The best part? Denzel Washington asks him how old he was during all this, and Peter Capaldi – red and making multiple attempts to cover his face – hesitates to answer.

“21,” he says with a chuckle. He’s more embarrassed about the age then the fact it’s Denzel Washington asking you about your geekdom. (That’s the part that would bother me.)

On the season premiere of The Graham Norton Show, the man behind the Twelfth Doctor talks about how he almost leaked Doctor Who casting news, and revisits photos from his work as a model… in the 1980s. To quote the Ninth Doctor: “Fantastic!”

The Graham Norton Show, with guests Denzel Washington, Gemma Arterton, and Peter Capaldi premieres Saturday, Oct. 4 at 11 p.m. EDT on BBC America. (Image ©2014 BBC)

Edit: What’s an “anorak”, exactly? Per Wikipedia: Anorak is a British slang term referring to “a person who has a very strong interest, perhaps obsessive, in niche subjects. This interest may be unacknowledged or not understood by the general public. The term is sometimes used synonymously with geek or nerd, or the Japanese term otaku, albeit referring to different niches.” I think I might like that one better than “geek”…

 

 

iOS 7 hands-on, GTA V impressions, and Doctor Who on Hulu Plus

The Mind Of The Geek Podcast returns for episode 64 with our hands-on impressions of Apple’s new iOS 7. Listen as we go through all the new features of iOS 7, and let you know which ones make it worth the upgrade, and others that have us scratching our heads. We also get some first impressions of Rockstar’s Grand Theft Auto V from Ro, and we talk about Hulu Plus now offering Doctor Who and other BBC content. Subscribe to the Mind Of The Geek Podcast now on iTunes, or listen on Stitcher Radio.

iOS 7 hands-on, GTA V impressions, and Doctor Who on Hulu Plus

The Mind Of The Geek Podcast returns for episode 64 with our hands-on impressions of Apple’s new iOS 7. Listen as we go through all the new features of iOS 7, and let you know which ones make it worth the upgrade, and others that have us scratching our heads. We also get some first impressions of Rockstar’s Grand Theft Auto V from Ro, and we talk about Hulu Plus now offering Doctor Who and other BBC content. Subscribe to the Mind Of The Geek Podcast now on iTunes, or listen on Stitcher Radio.

And the Twelfth Doctor is… [UPDATED]

It’s official. After weeks of rumors, the BBC has announced tonight – midnight local time – that the Twelfth Doctor will be revealed Sunday, Aug. 4 on a live BBC One half-hour broadcast called Doctor Who Live: The Next Doctor.

For those doing the math, that’s 2 p.m. ET Sunday, Aug. 4 here in the States.

According to the press release, “host Zoe Ball will unveil the Twelfth Doctor in the first ever interview in front of a live studio audience set against the backdrop of a swirling vortex, amongst Daleks and the TARDIS.”

The broadcast will include “live special guests, Doctors old and new, as well as companions and celebrity fans. Current Doctor Matt Smith and lead writer and executive producer Steven Moffat will both give interviews about one of the biggest roles in TV and set out just what it takes to be the Doctor.”

“The decision is made and the time has come to reveal who’s taking over the TARDIS,” Moffat said. “For the last of the Time Lords, the clock is striking twelve.”

“It’s the biggest secret in showbiz,” said BBC Drama Commissioning Controller Ben Stephenson. “We can’t wait to unveil the next Doctor with everyone live on BBC One. [There’s] been lots of fun and intrigue at work as we’ve been using the codename Houdini as a decoy!”

Current favorites for the role include Peter Capaldi and Rory Kinnear.

UPDATE: It’s Peter Capaldi! A (suddenly last-minute) favorite of British bookmakers, Capaldi has a history with the show, appearing in both The Fires of Pompeii and Torchwood: Children of Earth. He even looks somewhat like John Hurt, who mysteriously appeared as a version of the Doctor at the end of The Name of the Doctor.

“Being asked to play the Doctor is an amazing privilege,” Capaldi said. “Like the Doctor himself, I find myself in a state of utter terror and delight. I can’t wait to get started.”

Doctor Who’s next?

With just a few minutes left until Doctor Who Live: The Next Doctor airs on BBC America (BBC One, 7 p.m.), Mind Of The Geek takes a look at some favorites – from the probable to the highly unlikely – to succeed Matt Smith as the iconic Time Lord.

Doctor Who executive producer Steven Moffat has never been much for looking backward, possibly even when it comes to the show’s rich history.

“Start thinking it’s all about nostalgia,” he said back in March, “then you’re finished. It’s about moving forward.”

Ever since Matt Smith announced his departure from Doctor Who in the spring, speculation has run rampant over who’d (no pun intended) replace him. There were rumors the Doctor would regenerate into a woman (the possibility was finalized in series six’s The Doctor’s Wife), or that a black actor would be cast.

Without question, both possibilities would certainly move the show forward. But other, more hopeful possibilities might take the show backward.

As recently as last Wednesday, craggy comic actor Peter Capaldi has been named as a favorite of British bookmakers. He certainly has a history with the show, appearing in both The Fires of Pompeii and Torchwood: Children of Earth. (He even looks somewhat like John Hurt, who mysteriously appeared as a version of the Doctor at the end of The Name of the Doctor.)

Like Capaldi, Ben Daniels isn’t that familiar to American audiences, appearing in Netflix original House of Cards and box office underperformer Jack the Giant Slayer. (He’s a ginger, though, which would put to rest a long-running joke about the Doctor finally being regenerated into a redhead.)

Irishman Andrew Scott, another favorite due to his connections with Moffat and his other mammoth project Sherlock, would bring a sharper edge of wit to the venerable Time Lord. His Moriarty is both menacing and amusing in equal measure.

Skyfall’s Rory Kinnear was an early favorite, but was widely considered to be out of the running after being cast in another British television project.

“I can tell you it’s all bulls**t,” Kinnear said. “It feels like my name has been randomly chosen to satisfy the public appetite.”

“I can firmly deny that I am the next Doctor Who.”

For all the talk of casting a female Doctor, the two names continually mentioned are Olivia Colman, who appeared as a form of Prisoner Zero in The Eleventh Hour, and Billie Piper, known for her role as companion Rose Tyler. Piper is due to reprise her role in the upcoming 50th anniversary special. Despite the unlikelihood of Tyler being cast (she’s spent the last several years distancing herself from the role), there’s a precedent for a Time Lord choosing their shape. After Lalla Ward was cast to succeed Mary Tamm as Romana, a scene depicted her rifling through forms, with Romana settling on Princess Astra, a role Ward had played in an earlier Doctor Who adventure, The Armageddon Factor.

But that might run the risk of delving to deeply into nostalgia.

Black actors considered include Idris Elba, David Harewood and Chiwetel Ejiofor. Elba’s already a known quantity in the States, after a stint on The Office and appearing in Pacific Rim, and already stars in his own BBC One drama, Luther. (Luther creator Neil Cross wrote series seven episodes The Rings of Akhaten and Hide.) Harewood is another actor with a connection to Doctor Who, appearing as the creepy Joshua Naismith in The End of Time: Part One and Part Two.

Probably best known as the Operative in 2003’s Serenity, and due to star in October’s 12 Years a Slave, Chiwetel Ejiofor is a personal favorite for the role. Capable of being both sinister and sympathetic, he would bring a different, more mature quality to the role.

Ben Whishaw, who appeared alongside Kinnear in Skyfall as Q, is another name being tossed about.

As for left-field possibilities, Dame Helen Mirren once mentioned she was interested, until clarifying she wouldn’t want to play the first female Doctor.

All in all – and there’s been absolutely no indication this is even a possibility – Lucy Punch would make a fantastic female Doctor. Known in the states for roles in Bad Teacher and the sadly cancelled Ben & Kate, she’s just familiar enough to be recognizable and fresh enough to be dangerous.

Steven Moffat would approve.

(Image via Nerdy Bot)

And the Twelfth Doctor is …

It’s official. After weeks of rumors, the BBC has announced tonight – midnight local time – that the Twelfth Doctor will be revealed Sunday, Aug. 4 on a live BBC One half-hour broadcast called Doctor Who Live: The Next Doctor.

For those doing the math, that’s 2 p.m. ET Sunday, Aug. 4 here in the States.

According to the press release, “host Zoe Ball will unveil the Twelfth Doctor in the first ever interview in front of a live studio audience set against the backdrop of a swirling vortex, amongst Daleks and the TARDIS.”

The broadcast will include “live special guests, Doctors old and new, as well as companions and celebrity fans. Current Doctor Matt Smith and lead writer and executive producer Steven Moffat will both give interviews about one of the biggest roles in TV and set out just what it takes to be the Doctor.”

“The decision is made and the time has come to reveal who’s taking over the TARDIS,” Moffat said. “For the last of the Time Lords, the clock is striking twelve.”

“It’s the biggest secret in showbiz,” said BBC Drama Commissioning Controller Ben Stephenson. “We can’t wait to unveil the next Doctor with everyone live on BBC One. [There’s] been lots of fun and intrigue at work as we’ve been using the codename Houdini as a decoy!”

Current favorites for the role include Peter Capaldi and Rory Kinnear.

 

What happened at SDCC?

Last year, I wrote a thoughtful, insightful piece entitled – cleverly – SDCC 2012: The five most exciting announcements. Let’s have a look, shall we?

Go ahead. I’ll wait.

OK. You’re back. Pretty cool stuff, right? Legendary Comics was born (but, in the ensuing year, didn’t put out anything of note). The My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic comic – which, from what I understand, is quite good – was announced. The Man of Steel poster was neat, and setting up the second phase of the Marvel Cinematic Universe was… convenient, I guess? Really, the biggest surprise was the announcement that Godzilla was being remade/rebooted, which had been rumored, but no one knew was actually happening.

But I’m going to show you something, here. Even though you’ve likely already seen it, it works as an example for the kind of thing I’m about to get into:

(It should be clarified that what I’m talking about here has mostly to do with Movies & TV, as is my area, not comics. Even though it’s called “San Diego Comic-Con”, there tends to be a dearth of excitement about actual comics, but that’s another rant for another time.)

That video above is grainy as hell, but still stands as one of the great SDCC moments of the last decade (which is probably why Disney’s never pulled it). Nobody outside the industry – absolutely no one – knew that a Tron sequel was in the works. Because it wasn’t. The overall failure of Tron 2.0 had, apparently, killed any interest in the property. Disney hired Joseph Kosinski to whip up some test footage to show at SDCC just to gauge interest, and that clip up there – and the cheers, the oohs and ahs – resulted in Tron: Legacy (the artistic merits of which are still up for debate).

Surprises, necessarily, might not be what San Diego Comic-Con – and events of a similar ilk – is really about. But why couldn’t it be? And shouldn’t it be, especially in this hyper-connected era? If there is to be such a bottleneck on information coming out of SDCC – which there is – then why not make it especially special? Conventions draw together hundreds and thousands of fans to celebrate something they all have in common: Geek culture. We’re following the websites and blogs and industry gossip. The costumes. The arguments. The agreements. We love drinking the Kool-Aid, but it still needs sugar.

Where’s the f***ing sugar?

George Lucas previewed Star Wars at SDCC in 1976 because he knew those fans would get it; they already spoke the language he was trying to teach Hollywood. They figured it out after awhile, but developed their own dialect. A few years ago, Battlestar Galactica was lighting SDCC on fire. “It’s a TV show,” Hollywood pondered aloud. “Let’s use Comic-Con to get these nerds excited about TV shows!” When it’s Doctor Who, fine. When it’s The Walking Dead, fine. But Dexter? Breaking Bad? What do those have to do with anything even remotely sci-fi or genre? Dexter has some horror elements, but so does CSI. And you know who watches CSI? Your parents.

For a time, peaking with Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, Hollywood believed that if it sold at Comic-Con, it would sell all over. For the past decade, so-called “geek culture” helped defined pop culture. We got that excited. We had that much power. (We didn’t, really, but were able to convince the entertainment industry we did, which is a special power all its own.) But Scott Pilgrim was a financial failure. They don’t believe us anymore. The dollar signs aren’t as bright. Right now, Marvel’s doing well thanks to creative marketing and some great product, but soon they’re going to try out a property they can’t get anyone interested about. For some good sample data, take a look at Pacific Rim. That has everything a “geek” would love – good vs. evil, giant robots, great effects – but will barely make its money back. America went to see Grown Ups 2 instead. The less money made from offering up that teat to suckle, the fewer properties there will be to even imagine getting excited about.

Now. I know what you’re saying: “Haters gonna hate.” This isn’t about hate. Nerds can love a show about a chemistry teacher dealing meth hotter than the fire of a thousand suns. That’s what makes us nerds. This is about how San Diego Comic-Con 2013 – or, rather, the bigger entities that attended SDCC – did a wonderful job pulling the wool over our eyes.

Let’s take a look at another clip, shall we? This one from this year:

Zack Snyder seems genuinely warm and gracious toward the crowd. And watching Chris Hardwick pounding the table – wondering with his head in his hands what Snyder could possibly be talking about – is adorable. When this logo (!) was revealed, it was big Internet news. Why? This isn’t the first time a Batman/Superman team-up movie has been discussed, or announced (especially in the context of the “Nolan-verse”). This isn’t even the first time a “World’s Finest” movie has been greenlit. Nearly a decade ago, Wolfgang Petersen was all set to start casting Batman vs. Superman before financing fell through. Admittedly, it’s more likely now thanks to the box office success of Man of Steel and The Dark Knight trilogy, but there’s no real risk in this. There can’t be, these days. When George Miller had a Justice League script and cast living in Australia ready to go (before the WGA strike killed it), nothing quite like that had ever been done before. Now, Hollywood has to bank on sure things (Who wouldn’t love a Batman and Superman movie?) to make their money, but they also have to lure us into believing they’re listening to our unique snowflake opinions. It’s a classic bait-and-switch.

Last year, Edgar Wright’s Ant-Man was announced as part of Marvel’s second phase. In the days before SDCC 2013, Wright announced that his Ant-Man script was finished, putting filming sometime during the next slate, if ever. We knew that the Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Special was coming, and that David Tennant and Billie Piper were reprising their roles as the Tenth Doctor and Rose, respectively. Yet hours were waited for a glimpse of teaser footage. Hours were waited hoping for something – some kind of surprise –that never came. Fans brave the sweaty masses at SDCC to catch something someone else might not; the belief was that fans were steering the ship. But this recent trend – reaching both its apex and nadir at San Diego Comic-Con – isn’t about some ingrained love for the fans, the culture, storytelling, or taking imaginative properties to their full potential. It’s about monetizing nostalgia, and surgical marketing. It’s not an illusion; it’s a trick. And we’re beginning to figure out how it’s done.

(Image via Ramona Sentinel)

What happened at SDCC?

Last year, I wrote a thoughtful, insightful piece entitled – cleverly – SDCC 2012: The five most exciting announcements. Let’s have a look, shall we?

Go ahead. I’ll wait.

OK. You’re back. Pretty cool stuff, right? Legendary Comics was born (but, in the ensuing year, didn’t put out anything of note). The My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic comic – which, from what I understand, is quite good – was announced. The Man of Steel poster was neat, and setting up the second phase of the Marvel Cinematic Universe was… convenient, I guess? Really, the biggest surprise was the announcement that Godzilla was being remade/rebooted, which had been rumored, but no one knew was actually happening.

But I’m going to show you something, here. Even though you’ve likely already seen it, it works as an example for the kind of thing I’m about to get into:

(It should be clarified that what I’m talking about here has mostly to do with Movies & TV, as is my area, not comics. Even though it’s called “San Diego Comic-Con”, there tends to be a dearth of excitement about actual comics, but that’s another rant for another time.)

That video above is grainy as hell, but still stands as one of the great SDCC moments of the last decade (which is probably why Disney’s never pulled it). Nobody outside the industry – absolutely no one – knew that a Tron sequel was in the works. Because it wasn’t. The overall failure of Tron 2.0 had, apparently, killed any interest in the property. Disney hired Joseph Kosinski to whip up some test footage to show at SDCC just to gauge interest, and that clip up there – and the cheers, the oohs and ahs – resulted in Tron: Legacy (the artistic merits of which are still up for debate).

Surprises, necessarily, might not be what San Diego Comic-Con – and events of a similar ilk – is really about. But why couldn’t it be? And shouldn’t it be, especially in this hyper-connected era? If there is to be such a bottleneck on information coming out of SDCC – which there is – then why not make it especially special? Conventions draw together hundreds and thousands of fans to celebrate something they all have in common: Geek culture. We’re following the websites and blogs and industry gossip. The costumes. The arguments. The agreements. We love drinking the Kool-Aid, but it still needs sugar.

Where’s the f***ing sugar?

George Lucas previewed Star Wars at SDCC in 1976 because he knew those fans would get it; they already spoke the language he was trying to teach Hollywood. They figured it out after awhile, but developed their own dialect. A few years ago, Battlestar Galactica was lighting SDCC on fire. “It’s a TV show,” Hollywood pondered aloud. “Let’s use Comic-Con to get these nerds excited about TV shows!” When it’s Doctor Who, fine. When it’s The Walking Dead, fine. But Dexter? Breaking Bad? What do those have to do with anything even remotely sci-fi or genre? Dexter has some horror elements, but so does CSI. And you know who watches CSI? Your parents.

For a time, peaking with Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, Hollywood believed that if it sold at Comic-Con, it would sell all over. For the past decade, so-called “geek culture” helped defined pop culture. We got that excited. We had that much power. (We didn’t, really, but were able to convince the entertainment industry we did, which is a special power all its own.) But Scott Pilgrim was a financial failure. They don’t believe us anymore. The dollar signs aren’t as bright. Right now, Marvel’s doing well thanks to creative marketing and some great product, but soon they’re going to try out a property they can’t get anyone interested about. For some good sample data, take a look at Pacific Rim. That has everything a “geek” would love – good vs. evil, giant robots, great effects – but will barely make its money back. America went to see Grown Ups 2 instead. The less money made from offering up that teat to suckle, the fewer properties there will be to even imagine getting excited about.

Now. I know what you’re saying: “Haters gonna hate.” This isn’t about hate. Nerds can love a show about a chemistry teacher dealing meth hotter than the fire of a thousand suns. That’s what makes us nerds. This is about how San Diego Comic-Con 2013 – or, rather, the bigger entities that attended SDCC – did a wonderful job pulling the wool over our eyes.

Let’s take a look at another clip, shall we? This one from this year:

Zack Snyder seems genuinely warm and gracious toward the crowd. And watching Chris Hardwick pounding the table – wondering with his head in his hands what Snyder could possibly be talking about – is adorable. When this logo (!) was revealed, it was big Internet news. Why? This isn’t the first time a Batman/Superman team-up movie has been discussed, or announced (especially in the context of the “Nolan-verse”). This isn’t even the first time a “World’s Finest” movie has been greenlit. Nearly a decade ago, Wolfgang Petersen was all set to start casting Batman vs. Superman before financing fell through. Admittedly, it’s more likely now thanks to the box office success of Man of Steel and The Dark Knight trilogy, but there’s no real risk in this. There can’t be, these days. When George Miller had a Justice League script and cast living in Australia ready to go (before the WGA strike killed it), nothing quite like that had ever been done before. Now, Hollywood has to bank on sure things (Who wouldn’t love a Batman and Superman movie?) to make their money, but they also have to lure us into believing they’re listening to our unique snowflake opinions. It’s a classic bait-and-switch.

Last year, Edgar Wright’s Ant-Man was announced as part of Marvel’s second phase. In the days before SDCC 2013, Wright announced that his Ant-Man script was finished, putting filming sometime during the next slate, if ever. We knew that the Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Special was coming, and that David Tennant and Billie Piper were reprising their roles as the Tenth Doctor and Rose, respectively. Yet hours were waited for a glimpse of teaser footage. Hours were waited hoping for something – some kind of surprise –that never came. Fans brave the sweaty masses at SDCC to catch something someone else might not; the belief was that fans were steering the ship. But this recent trend – reaching both its apex and nadir at San Diego Comic-Con – isn’t about some ingrained love for the fans, the culture, storytelling, or taking imaginative properties to their full potential. It’s about monetizing nostalgia, and surgical marketing. It’s not an illusion; it’s a trick. And we’re beginning to figure out how it’s done.

(Image via Ramona Sentinel)

The Doctor Is In ‘Doctor Who’ Giveaway

th anniversary special of Doctor Who on the horizon November 23, Whovians across the world are rejoicing in a half-century of programming genius. We might not know “who” the Twelfth Doctor might be but, in the meantime, getting a little nostalgic with this Fourth Doctor scarf might help slow your bated breath.

That’s right: The Doctor is still in after 50 years and the fanfare surrounding this momentous occasion is steadily building into a wave. Now’s your chance to ride that wave and get a little piece of Doctor Who history for yourself, courtesy of our friends over at HalloweenCostumes.com.

Enter for your chance to win this Fourth Doctor Doctor Who scarf by leaving a comment on the post below. One winner will be chosen at random; this contest will run until Wednesday, June 26. (Sorry for those across the pond, but this giveaway is for U.S. residents only.)